CIVIL WAR CDV PHOTO CAPTAIN JOHN SHERRATT 42nd US COLORED TROOPS ROCKFORD IL

CIVIL WAR CDV PHOTO CAPTAIN JOHN SHERRATT 42nd US COLORED TROOPS ROCKFORD IL

CIVIL WAR CDV PHOTO CAPTAIN JOHN SHERRATT 42nd US COLORED TROOPS ROCKFORD IL

HISTORIC AND ORIGINAL SIGNED CIVIL WAR CDV PHOTOGRAPH OF CAPTAIN JOHN H. SHERRATT, COMPANY E 42nd USCT UNITED STATES COLORED TROOPS REGIMENT74th ILLINOIS DISTINGUISED SERVICE WITH THE ARMY OF THE CUMBERLAND, PARTICIPATING IN SEVERAL OF THE MOST NOTED BATTLES OF THE WAR. Sherratt enlisted in 1862 in the 74th Regiment of the Illinois Volunteers. Served through the war as a private lieutenant, quartermaster, staff officer, and at the close of the war, as Provost Marshall of Huntsville, Alabama. He was a commander of Nevius Post G. A. R. And at the time of his death was junior-vice commander of the Illinois Dept. Of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion. During the Spanish War, he served as the President of the Winnebago County Army and Navy League and from his exertions at that time may be dated his failure in health. An ardent but righteous politician, Captain Sherratt never sought office and held it but once and then by popular vote. In an article dated March 16, 1906 Rockford Morning Star: Captain John Hall Sheratt Passes Away from This Life One of Rockford’s Noblest Citizens Called to His Heavenly Home Dies in Philadelphia At 7:45 last nite, Captain John Hall Sheratt passed away in Philadelphia at Medico-Chir-Surgical Hospital, aged 62 years. Though expected for several days the news of his death will shock this community and cause profound sorrow, for in this community he was greatly esteemed and highly respected. Indeed, he was in many respects, Rockford’s first citizen. In this country he was born, and here, except the years he spent in the service of his country, he spent his busy and upright life. All came to know him and to know him meant to honor admire and to love him. His integrity of purpose, his faithful devotion to principle and observance to duty, his uniform courtesy and kindness, and manner and the gentle firmness with which he enforced his views and convictions made for him ardent admirers, and sincere friends, equalled perhaps by no citizen of his time. In the city he loved so well and to whose upbuilding he contributed so much, he stood as a pillar of strength, a sentinel who ever pointed to the betterment. The people who knew him from childhood and those who became attached to him after he reached man’s estate, paid him the greatest honor ever visited upon a citizen. In 1889 there was a widespread desire to that the mayor soon to be elected, should in every way represent the hopes and ambitions of the growing city. All thoughts at once concentrated upon Capt. Sheratt, and though he was in California at the time, he was placed in nomination and elected almost without his knowledge or consent. The substantial majority he received over an admirable opponent bespoke the high esteem in which he was held. It was a critical period in the life of the city. Great changes were taking place and new comers were arriving on every train. The city was standing still when the fates had decreed it must advance if guided by a safe and gentle hand. Mayor Sherratt infused new energy in the affairs of the municipality. He gave zeal and new ambition and hope to all. He paved the main business streets, built the girder bridge against great opposition, and greatly strenghted the cities credit. He became known as Rockfords model mayor, an ideal executive. At the end of the term he was appealed to by the citizens at large to serve another term, but resolutely declined. The impress of his splendid administration still remains. Sherratt was equally loved by the poor and lowly as the strong and wealthy, and his passing will carry sadness to thousands who have felt the sunshine of his presence and been pressed and encouraged to works of personal effort as the only road to success in the great battle of life before them. The name of John Hall Sherratt is associated with enterprises which will live and remain as monuments to his great business ability, while his life is embellished with acts of kindness to those from whom he expected nothing but grateful rememberance. In a wide and varied experience among men, in every walk of life, it has been the fortune of the writer to meet few such men as Capt. Elequent tributes will be paid to his memory, his early struggles with adversity, so admirable so imposing. But only those who knew him well, his confidents, can tell of the beautiful, the symetrical character he developed. It came from a higher source, it rested upon a foundation more solid than the culture of schools. It was the culture of a Christian home, surrounding his boyhood days with all it’s hallowed influence, and abiding with him through life, to mould, to fashion, to control and to upbuild. This was the source of his sturdy independence and indomitable will, of his steady and progressive advance toward the accomplishment of his purposes, as it was the true secret of his success, his sweet and even temper, his abiding character and immovable trust. This it was that gave such influence to his council, such weight to his views, this it was that made him in the quiet of his home a radiant sunlight, brightening and cheering all around, and that which has made him beloved and honored and generally mourned. The character of the deceased is read in his achievements. A product of the common schools he became the president of a college. The young man whose proud boast it was that he earned his first fifty cents in the patriotic service of his country, became the president of a national bank. He had strong civic pride. He loved Rockford and sought and studied it’s betterment and advancement. “We are letting our opportunity pass, ” he once said to the writer. We need a large park. We must remember we are a city of workingmen. They need a breathing spot, a place where they can take their families during the summer months and be near nature. The workingmen had no truer friend. He who had toiled himself aimed at the amelioration of the toiler. He too was a lover of his country. When the immortal issued his first call for troops, Captain Sherratt, though a mere boy, was among the earliest to respond. He became a member of the 74th Illinois Volunteers and when the glorious deeds of that band of patriots is written the fame of Private Sherratt will be part of it. He loved his old comrades and was particulary fond of Nevius Post and the Grand Army of the Republic in general. His bravery in a subordinate position earned the promotion to a captaincy. As soldier or civilian he was faithful to his ideals and his ideals were ever high. But it was in his home where John H. Sherratt appeared at his best. Here in his beautiful residence on the banks of the Rock river he passed in quiet and study the russett days of his busy life. It was the abode of a self made man, but none the less a man of culture and refinement. He had married happily, ideally. Husband and wife were united by kindred ties. Their thoughts, their hopes, ambitions were akin. They believed fully and changelessly in each other and they were as firmly lovers on that day his spirit took it’s flight as when they were united in the long ago. Here he sought rest from long toil. Here with his books and loved ones he found that peace, happiness and contentment he had so long striven for. Here in the glow of the sunset of a splendid career he dealt out charities and hospitalities with no unsparing hand. A man of the people with the advantages afforded by the common schools of fifty years ago, strengthened by self teaching, has gone to claim his reward. His life might well be studied and emulated by the youth of this city. It contained no stain. It is full of good deeds, it reveals a man who did his duty always and was faithfull in all things. It covered and included duty to man and God and duty to self. It made him the first citizen of Rockford. It gave him a proud position among men. Vale and farewell to this splendid, gentle, courteous, and wholesouled man. Well might we say with the Bard of Avon – His life was gentle, and the elements so mixed in him, that nature might stand up and say to all the world, this was a man. Captain John Hall Sherratt was born in Burritt Township, Winnebago county, April 12, 1844, and was educated in the public schools. His parents Thomas and Lydia Holmes Sherratt, were among the early settlers of the county and first resided upon a farm, but later his father opened a harness shop in Rockford. August 7, 1862, he enlisted as a private in the 74th Illinois Volunteers. The regiment was with the Army of the Cumberland and participated in several of the most noted battles of the war. He was mustered out of service January 31, 1866, with the rank of Captain. He was the director of the Third National bank for several years, and at the death of Mr. Spafford in 1897, was elected president of this institution. Upon his administration the business of the bank has met with marked success, and is one of the strong financial institutions of this city. Captain Sherratt was elected mayor of Rockford in 1889, and served two years. He assisted in the organization of the Rockford Country club and was it’s first president. He was the president of the board of trustees of Rockford Hospital and also of Rockford college, in both of which institutions he was deeply interested. Sherratt was married to Miss Harriet E. Wight, daughter of Hon. Wight, of this city, July 9, 1873. Sherratt was blessed with good health up until about two years ago when he began showing signs of failing. The ailment gradually grew worse and on the advise of his physician he went to Philadelphia to be treated by a specialist. It was his intention to spend the past winter in California and, accompanied by Mrs. Sherratt, he left for the pacific coast several weeks ago. In order to strengthen himself for the journey he stopped in Philadelphia where the specialist again treated him. He made no gain and several days ago word came that he was failing. Everett, agent of the C. Was wired to come at once and bring Mr. Sherratt home on a special train. Sherratt, a brother of the deceased. Everett left for Philadelphia at once. On arriving there it see that the patient could not stand the journey and that all hope was gone. Last nite news of his death came. The remains will leave Philadelphia for Rockford today. There are a couple of pictures shown of Captain Sherratt for Reference only. Please check out all the photos as they are part of the description. Be sure to add me to your. For excellent antiques, photographs, & postcards, check out this store. The free listing tool. The item “CIVIL WAR CDV PHOTO CAPTAIN JOHN SHERRATT 42nd US COLORED TROOPS ROCKFORD IL” is in sale since Tuesday, March 28, 2017. This item is in the category “Collectibles\Photographic Images\Vintage & Antique (Pre-1940)\CDVs”. The seller is “eddie007″ and is located in Columbia, Kentucky. This item can be shipped to United States.


Comments are closed.